Choosing a Profile or Cover Photo for Your Brand on Social Media

Your profile and cover photo represent your company or brand on social media so it’s important to pick out the best possible one to attract fans and followers. Here are a few tips to pick out the best photos:

  • Size – Size requirements vary for each social media platform. Tailor your profile picture to fit these size requirements for the highest quality and best looking photo. Keep in mind that your profile picture will appear smaller in news feeds and when you comment, but it can also be viewed as a large image, so it’s important to account for recognition and photo quality.
  • Text – Keep profile pictures and cover photos as visual as possible. Too much text can be confusing and distracting for users. As mentioned in the previous tip, text can also be hard to decipher in the small scale of a profile picture in a news feed.
  • Up-to-Date – Make sure your profile picture represents your company as it is currently known. Update your profile and cover photos for important campaigns, product releases or news. Just don’t change them too often or you risk confusing people.
  • Consistency – Keep your profile and cover photos consistent across all social media platforms to help people know they are looking at the right brand. Consistent images will also help build brand recognition on social media, which is hugely important to building an audience on social.
  • Complementary – While there’s no need to go as far as making your cover and profile photo appear to be one photo—even though it looks great—they should complement each other; meaning similar color schemes, font and feel.
corona

Corona’s Facebook profile shows an example where a profile photo and a cover photo appear to be one.

Do you have any additional advice for brands picking out profile or cover photos? Let us know in the comments!

Contact Yearick-Millea to learn more about how we can help with your social media strategy. 

Face-to-Face Time with Clients Still Matters

It’s no secret that our world is technologically-driven. Long gone are the days where face-to-face—and even telephone—interaction was the preferred way to communicate with others. Now we email, text, tweet or send Facebook messages to coworkers (even if they’re sitting a few feet away), clients, reporters and other contacts we might need to speak to.

Communicating this way is convenient; it makes it easier for you to keep written records or to refer back to older messages; and a lot of times, it’s the best way to get a hold of someone who has a really busy schedule or isn’t in town.

The public relations industry is based on communication, engagement and relationship building. While emailing or texting have become more popular, face-to-face communication is still crucial in the industry for quite a few reasons:

  • You make deeper connections: Having a face-to-face meeting allows you to connect with clients or reporters on a more personal level because you’re taking the time to have a conversation outside of a superficial email setting. It gives you the opportunity to get to know the people you are working with, and on the flip side, they get to know you. Meetings like these have the potential to create lasting relationships with clients or other contacts because you’re working with someone beyond the computer/phone screen.
  • You come to quicker solutions: While it’s true that sending an email/text is convenient and fast, that’s often not the case when you’re dealing with a complex issue that needs a solution. There’s a bit of disconnect when you’re communicating via email. Nonverbal cues and tone are absent, so there’s more room for miscommunication or misinterpretation. Going back and forth to explain an issue or a solution to that issue in an email chain often is more difficult and more time consuming than talking about it in person. If speaking face-to-face isn’t possible, talk on the phone or have a FaceTime session! You’ll be on your way to a solution in no time.
  • You stay focused: If your client is going to work with you on a big project, invite them to an in-person meeting. In this instance, email would be fine for sending important documents and information that are essential to the project, but go over those documents in person to make sure that everything is covered and all of your questions are answered before you begin working on it. Email and telephone follow-ups are inevitable, but the initial communication about an important project should be more focused and personal.

Meeting with someone in person is definitely worth the effort. To make the process a little easier, talk with your clients about getting together in person once a month or every few weeks. Try to schedule the next meeting at the end of each one. Other plans and projects come up, of course, but penciling in that face time is a step in the right direction.